Saturday, December 6, 2014

Kids With Family History Of Substance Abuse Have Brains That Must Work Harder To Fight Impulses

I've long known that impulse control figured in heavily for us alcoholics and we know that addiction is hereditary (there are other ways to "get" it too), but never thought that children of alcoholics would have a harder time with impulse control. Makes sense though. REad about it from the Medical Daily.





Kids With Family History Of Substance Abuse Have Brains That Must Work Harder To Fight Impulses: " One in five kids grows up with an alcohol relative, according to the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry . These kids are four times more likely to become alcoholics. However, a new study  suggests it’s not entirely because of the environment they’re in, but instead because their brains are predisposed to improper development."


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Monday, November 24, 2014

Holly: One face of the national heroin crisis | News |

Holly: One face of the national heroin crisis | News | witf.org:

"Now she’s serious and listens carefully, and she talks freely about her addiction, as if recounting how much she’s changed helps her get through each day. She’s going to meetings, seeing her son in therapy, playing with her daughter, cooking supper for the family."



Although the details of Holly's plight may be unique, there is a pattern that a great number of addicts can relate to.  As an adolescent, Holly drank alcohol in awkward social situations simply to "loosen up."  In her 20s, she dabbled with cocaine but strictly on the weekends and was still able show up for work on time on Monday morning and still had her rent money ready on the first of every month.  Then Holly began to crush and snort prescription pain pills socially with friends while still believing she was in control.  After finding the pain pills too expensive, she sought out heroin, though initially, only recreationally on payday.  Before she knew it, life was unmanageable.  Bills were no longer being payed as every last dime went towards supporting her addiction and her only concern was where her next fix was going to come from in order to avoid the merciless pains of withdrawal.

If you can identify with this sequence of events, you should know that you are not alone and that refuge is available at your local NA or AA chapter where fellow addicts are eager to lend you their support on your recovery journey.



-Hannah




Wednesday, November 19, 2014

North Carolina parents shocked to learn children are abusing over-the-counter drug

Parents are shocked that kids are finding creative ways to get high?  Parents were kids once too and need to be aware of the newest trends and tactics that are popular among today's youth.





North Carolina parents shocked to learn children are abusing over-the-counter drug | abc13.com: "One Triangle dad noticed his son's behavior change and feared he was on something. But when a drug test came back negative, he kept looking for answers.

"I went like a tornado in his room and found about three bottles of the Robitussin, about two or three boxes of that cold and cough medicine," he said. "I was infuriated as a parent.""


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Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Cough sryup making a comeback

Unfortunately drugs are cyclic--a generation uses them, then they tire of it and parents take a stance against it and then the next drug revolves around--it goes from speed, to heroin, to party drugs, to prescription drugs, to glue, and then cycles around again. This is something we need to stay on top of, but not be shocked by. kids will always find ways to do drugs--and hopefully we will find out and take action before it kills them...





I-Team Troubleshooter: North Carolina parents shocked to learn children are abusing over-the-counter drug | abc11.com: "In addition to Skittles or Triple-C, teenagers are calling the drug Tussin, Robotripping, and Dex. But essentially, it is simply over-the-counter cough syrup, often mixed with soda or other drugs such as marijuana.

Abusers are after the active ingredient in regular over-the-counter cough syrup, dextromethorphan, or DXM.
"



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Wednesday, November 5, 2014

Officials, parents, former N.Y. Giant address drug epidemic at Pinelands Regional forum

I know we need to share with each other about what drugs do to kinds--I ran across this story this morning--Christopher not waking up... I am so grateful that did not happen to me as a mother. Trisha---my heart goes out to you, and I want to thank you for sharing with the other parents.



Officials, parents, former N.Y. Giant address drug epidemic at Pinelands Regional forum | NJ.com: "LITTLE EGG HARBOR – Trisha Horner told a packed auditorium inside Pinelands Regional High School on Wednesday night about how much she loved her son Christopher and what a great child he was."


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Friday, October 31, 2014

Make Sure Halloween Candy Doesn’t Contain Marijuana

Geeze, as if we don't ahve enough to worry about--now we have to look for Maryjane in th candy!!!!







Denver Police to Parents: Make Sure Halloween Candy Doesn’t Contain Marijuana - Partnership for Drug-Free Kids: "Marijuana edible products can mimic candy such as Sour Patch Kids, Jolly Ranchers and gummy bears, the video cautions parents. Patrick Johnson, the owner of Urban Dispensary, says, “There’s really no way to tell the difference. It’s best just to toss that stuff into the trash.”"



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Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Your Face as a Long-term Alcoholic or in the Press, your face on Meth

I like this online tool. Good for "rehabs.com"   Get your son or duaghter (or self) and upload a pic. Then see what taking drugs does to you!

Thanks to New York Daily news for photo.
Your Face as a Long-term Alcoholic: "Alcohol maintains a near ubiquitous presence in the daily lives of many of us—it is easily purchased at restaurants and convenience stores, present in many celebratory and spiritual ceremonies and, of course, heavily featured in movies and television. Perhaps as a result, alcoholism and the damaging effects of alcohol abuse are frequently downplayed or overlooked altogether."
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